Thursday, July 16, 2009

Film Goats ride again! Trylon Grand Opening!

Trylon + Film Goats

Fun!

Yes folks. This weekend is the grand opening of the Twin Cities newest movie house, the little theater that could, the Trylon Microcinema! Opening with a Buster Keaton series with live music played by the Dreamland Faces, you could hardly ask for more. I proposed an after party involving kegs and dancing girls and smashing champagne bottles over the projectors, but Barry said no. Next best thing? Head down to Lake Street to the Town Talk Diner for some designer drinks and you're invited!

If you are as excited as me and Daniel over at Getafilm, join us Friday night post-screening for conversation and drink. Daniel and I are going to the 7pm show (sold out) and will be heading down to the Town Talk after. Don't worry, we'll still be there after the 9pm show (almost sold out) in hopes of bringing Barry, Trylon mastermind, out for a celebratory cheer. Don't know who the hell I am? I'll wear a Radio K t-shirt, so come and find me.

Want a little more info on the Trylon? Here's a primer:
Remember, the Trylon series doesn't end after this weekend. The Great Stone Face: Six from Buster Keaton continues over the next three weekends. Buy your ticket in advance or you may find yourself out in the cold. Here are the particulars on the series:

The Great Stone Face:
Six From Buster Keaton

Accompanied by the music of Dreamland Faces

Starting July 17th
The Trylon microcinema
3258 Minnehaha Ave S
Tickets: $8
Suggested donation for live music: $2

The all-volunteer staff of Take-Up Productions has worked for three years to put together the money for our own theater. On July 17th, we're opening The Trylon in south Minneapolis, a few blocks from the Lake Street LRT station. We've decided to open our microcinema with a film series starring Buster Keaton, featuring the accompaniment of Dreamland Faces on accordion and singing saw.

Sherlock Jr (1924)
July 17 and 18 at 7pm and 9pm

Woody Allen's Purple Rose of Cairo is a delight, but Buster Keaton did it first. Projectionist Buster — dreaming he’s an ace detective — jumps right on to the movie screen, finding himself furiously edited from garden bench to city street to cliff — but finally becoming the ace detective of his wildest cinema fantasies.

Preceded by the short: The Electric House (1922) Buster designs a house with all the latest gadgets for a real estate tycoon who will buy thousands if the model home impresses him. But during the demonstration, everything that can go wrong, does - hilariously!

The Navigator (1924)
July 24 and 25 at 7pm and 9pm

Keaton’s top money-maker began with the biggest prop of his career: an ocean liner. Pampered playboy Buster is stranded on same with equally helpless airhead Kathryn McGuire. The ship finally runs aground on a desert island where the two unfortunates are chased by cannibals. One of Keaton's most revered films.

Preceded by the short film: The Ballonatic (1923) Buster rises to new heights as he sails heavenward in a balloon. He bumps into clouds, and in trying to bring down a duck, punctures the gas bag and crashes in the woods where he saves Phyllis Haver from a bear and falls in love. His courtship and the 'balloonatic' events that follow are hilarious!

Seven Chances (1925)
July 31 and August 1 at 7pm and 9pm

Buster gets word that if he can be married by 7 o'clock that evening, he will inherit $7,000,000. When his sweetheart refuses, he proposes to everyone in skirts, including a Scotsman! Hopeful still, he advertises for a bride and is horrified to discover 500 would-be brides hot on his trail in a hilarious chase to the finish!

Preceded by the short film: The Goat (1921) A mistaken-identity crisis precipitates an almost continuous - and continuously brilliant - chase through two adjoining towns where Buster is taken for 'Deadeye Dan, Public Enemy'."

Advance tickets are now on sale at Take-Up's brownpapertickets.com page.

3 comments:

Daniel Getahun said...

Alright, that goat picture is actually a little creepy. May it's the black and whiteness of it. The goat could either be laughing and having a great time, or in dark, suffering pain. Let's go with the former.

See you tonight - hope it doesn't blizzard...

Kathie Smith said...

I just couldn't put a color photo of a goat next to Buster Keaton...the little guy is definitely laughing, but maybe in a creepy way!

Barry Kryshka said...

Last night, Dreamland Faces deposited a gong at the Trylon. Yes, you heard me.